Cars and Trucks are Naked Without 24 Hour Security Cameras

Cars and trucks are a large investment for most of us. So why don’t our vehicles come with security cameras that work when our vehicle is parked and the engine is turned off? Wouldn’t it make sense for the industry to install 24-hour security cameras inside of them to protect that investment? Wouldn’t insurance companies line up to offer more affordable insurance to any car or truck with that extra feature? Our vehicles are always vulnerable to vandalism when they’re parked on the streets or in a parking lot where they are out of our line of sight. Just like any home security alarm, vehicle security cameras should notify us when someone is vandalizing our vehicles or trying to take it for a joy ride. No matter where you are, you should be able to see and hear what’s happening in and around your vehicle in real time from your mobile phone or computer.

Over the past few years, we’ve seen some new cars being sold with surround cameras to help us see our surroundings when we are taking off or to assist us while we park. I’ve even seen a new commercial showing a large truck with an updated tow camera backup to a boat without assistance. 10 points for creativity but we haven’t seen any of these cameras continuously stay on to monitor our vehicles in park mode. There is a good reason why car and truck manufacturers leave security cameras up to aftermarket suppliers. They do not want to get into battery issues with their vehicles. Vehicle battery technology hasn’t improved in decades and why should it. Most new technologies added to vehicles today only are used when the vehicle is on. The battery only has to start the engine and keep a low voltage alarm system working when the vehicle is off. A new or well-charged car battery can handle added security cameras at 12 volts but older batteries with a lower charge may have problems starting an engine after supplying power to cameras overnight.  There is one interesting fact about vehicle battery power, electric and hybrid cars like Tesla and Chevy Bolt don’t have these problems since their power source is their large battery.

A 24-hour security camera system can be added to any gas or diesel engine vehicle (which is 97% of the vehicles on the road today) with a power management system that protects your battery from a complete power drain on your battery. There is a new 24 Hour Vehicle Camera System that comes with a PMP controller that monitors any vehicle battery to make sure that it has more than enough power to start the vehicle’s engine within a 24 to 48-hour time window. It’s also the only aftermarket camera system that can give 360-degree video coverage and allow those cameras to be viewed and controlled from anywhere using its mobile app that allows a viewer to see and hear what is happening inside and outside of their vehicle live or during playback. With the built-in GPS system, the viewer would also know where their car is parked or where it’s going in drive mode.

 

Thankfully, the 2 cameras that are included in the system have super wide lenses. These lenses give surround video security with sound when the cameras are facing inward and looking out through the vehicle’s windows. The cameras capture the side of the car or truck twice with both cameras giving you a two sided view of any perpetrator trying to vandalize your vehicle. If you’re worried about hackers viewing your cameras without your permission, rest assured, The vehicle camera system uses bank encrypted password protection to keep you safe from unwanted viewers of your cameras.

Hacking may be one of the bigger issues that keep car companies from adding security cameras to their vehicles. Even with bank encrypted password protection, owners have to make sure to change the camera system’s default password that comes with every system and choose their own new password. Car companies have to take into account the laxness of most consumer when it comes to passwords.  Even if a small fraction of owners forgets or refuse to change their password, It can become a PR nightmare for any car manufacturer if their customers are hacked and private videos of their most intimate moments are shared online. Consumers and manufacturers have to stay wary of default passwords. Bank encrypted technology is useless if the user does not take full advantage of that protection.

Another good reason car manufacturers may have sideline adding security cameras in their vehicles is the legal ramification of governments asking for access to the camera’s video recordings and GPS locations. No one wants a public battle Apple experienced when it refused to allow the U.S. government to view encrypted details in a suspected terrorist iPhone. Apple was able to deal with the onslaught of government criticism because their product is part of a brand where privacy is a big part of their marketing. Car manufacturers products are about luxury, convenience or low-cost transportation. Encryption and data privacy is not a responsibility they may want to deal with.

Aftermarket suppliers of security cameras for vehicles can actually revel in such a fight with any government because it helps publicize their brand and gives them the best marketing ploy available, infamous notoriety. Privacy in video storage and transmission is a key to their marketing strategy.

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About Armand Lucas 82 Articles

I’ve installed security cameras and home automation systems for over 15 years. Now as a consultant, I Investigate and write about new technology as they emerge to help all of us to become more secure, independent and productive in our homes, businesses and vehicles.

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